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Xyloglucan (hepta+octa+nona saccharides)

Xyloglucan hepta octa nona saccharides O-XGHON
Product code: O-XGHON
€168.00

100 mg

Prices exclude VAT

Available for shipping

Content: 100 mg
Shipping Temperature: Ambient
Storage Temperature: Below -10oC
Physical Form: Powder
Stability: > 10 years under recommended storage conditions
CAS Number: 121591-98-8,
121591-99-9,
129865-06-1
Molecular Weight: 1064.94,
1225.06,
1387.2
Purity: ~ 95%
Substrate For (Enzyme): Xyloglucanase

High purity Xyloglucan (hepta+octa+nona saccharides) for use in research, biochemical enzyme assays and in vitro diagnostic analysis. 

The oligosaccharides present in the mixture are XXXG, XXLG and XLLG according the letter code naming convention employed by Fry et al.1 where each segment is assigned a single letter based on its sidechain motif: unsubstituted D-Glcp is assigned G, α-D-Xylp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp segments are named X and β-D-Galp-(1-2)-α-D-Xylp-(1-6)-β-D-Glcp is assigned L.

Fry, S. C., York, W. S., Albersheim, P., Darvill, A., Hayashi, T., Joseleau, J. P., Kato, Y., Lorences, E. P., Maclachlan, G. A., McNeil, M., Mort, A. J., Reid, J. S. G., Seitz, H. U., Selvendran, R. R., Voragen, A. G. J. & White, A. R. (1993). Physiol. Plant89, 1–3.

Documents
Certificate of Analysis
Safety Data Sheet
Booklet
Publications
Publication
Versatile high resolution oligosaccharide microarrays for plant glycobiology and cell wall research.

Pedersen, H. L., Fangel, J. U., McCleary, B., Ruzanski, C., Rydahl, M. G., Ralet, M. C., Farkas, V., Von Schantz, L., Marcus, S. E., Andersen, M.C. F., Field, R., Ohlin, M., Knox, J. P., Clausen, M. H. & Willats, W. G. T. (2012). Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287(47), 39429-39438.

Microarrays are powerful tools for high throughput analysis, and hundreds or thousands of molecular interactions can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Nucleotide microarrays are well established in plant research, but carbohydrate microarrays are much less established, and one reason for this is a lack of suitable glycans with which to populate arrays. Polysaccharide microarrays are relatively easy to produce because of the ease of immobilizing large polymers noncovalently onto a variety of microarray surfaces, but they lack analytical resolution because polysaccharides often contain multiple distinct carbohydrate substructures. Microarrays of defined oligosaccharides potentially overcome this problem but are harder to produce because oligosaccharides usually require coupling prior to immobilization. We have assembled a library of well characterized plant oligosaccharides produced either by partial hydrolysis from polysaccharides or by de novo chemical synthesis. Once coupled to protein, these neoglycoconjugates are versatile reagents that can be printed as microarrays onto a variety of slide types and membranes. We show that these microarrays are suitable for the high throughput characterization of the recognition capabilities of monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and other oligosaccharide-binding proteins of biological significance and also that they have potential for the characterization of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

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Publication
Distribution of cell wall hemicelluloses in the wheat grain endosperm: a 3D perspective.

Fanuel, M., Ropartz, D., Guillon, F., Saulnier, L. & Rogniaux, H. (2018). Planta, 1-9.

Uneven distribution of AX and BG in lateral and longitudinal dimensions of a wheat grain was observed by three-dimensional MS imaging, presumably related to specific physicochemical properties of cell walls. Arabinoxylans (AX) and β-glucans (BG) are the main hemicelluloses that comprise the primary walls of starchy endosperm. These components are not evenly distributed in the endosperm, and the impact of their distribution on cell wall properties is not yet fully understood. Combined with on-tissue enzymatic degradation of the cell walls, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was used to monitor the molecular structure of AX and BG in thirty consecutive cross-sections of a mature wheat grain. A 3D image was built from the planar images, showing the distribution of these polymers at the full-grain level, both in lateral and longitudinal dimensions. BGs were more abundant at the vicinity of the germ and in the central cells of the endosperm, while AX, and especially highly substituted AX, were more abundant close to the brush and in the cells surrounding the crease (i.e., the transfer cells). Compared with the previously reported protocol, significant improvements were made in the tissue preparation to better preserve the shape of the fragile sections. This allowed to us achieve a good-quality 3D reconstruction from the consecutive 2D images. By providing a continuous view of the molecular distribution of the cell wall components across and along the grain, the three-dimensional images obtained by MSI may help understand the structure–function relationships of cell walls. The method should be readily extendable to other parietal polymers by selecting the appropriate enzymes.

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Publication
The contribution of cell wall composition in the expansion of Camellia sinensis seedlings roots in response to aluminum.

Safari, M., Ghanati, F., Safarnejad, M. R. & Chashmi, N. A. (2017). Planta, 1-12.

Unlike most terrestrial plants, tea (Camellia sinensis L.) responds to aluminum (Al) through the promotion of its root elongation; but the real mechanism(s) behind this phenomenon is not well understood. A plausible relationship between the modifications of the cell wall and the promotion of root elongation was examined in tea seedlings treated for 8 days with 400 µM Al. The mechanical properties of the cell wall, the composition of its polysaccharides and their capacity to absorb Al, the expression of genes, and the activities of the wall-modifying proteins were studied. With 6 h of the treatment, about 40% of the absorbed Al was bound to the cell wall; however, the amount did not increase thereafter. Meanwhile, the activity of pectin methylesterase, the level of pectin demethylation, the amounts and the average molecular mass of xyloglucan in the root apices significantly decreased upon exposure to Al, resulting in the reduction of Al binding sites. On the other hand, the activity and the gene expression of peroxidase decreased, whereas the activity and gene expression of xyloglucan-degrading enzymes, the expression of expansin A and the H+-ATPase4 genes increased in the Al-treated plants. Interestingly, it was accompanied by the increase of elastic and viscous extensibility of the root apices. From the results, it can be suggested that the biochemical modification of the cell walls reduces sites of Al binding to roots and triggers the activity of the loosening agents, thereby increasing the length of tea roots.

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Safety Information
Symbol : Not Applicable
Signal Word : Not Applicable
Hazard Statements : Not Applicable
Precautionary Statements : Not Applicable
Safety Data Sheet
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