The product has been successfully added to your shopping list.

Higher DP Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides

Higher DP Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides O-XGHDP
Product code: O-XGHDP
€164.00

100 mg

Prices exclude VAT

This product is currently unavailable, please contact cs@megazyme.com.

Content: 100 mg
Shipping Temperature: Ambient
Storage Temperature: Ambient
Physical Form: Powder
Stability: > 10 years under recommended storage conditions
CAS Number: Not Applicable
Molecular Weight: 3,000-4,000
Purity: ~ 95%
Substrate For (Enzyme): Xyloglucanase

This product has been discontinued (read more).

Higher Degree of Polymerisation Xyloglucan Oligosaccharides for use in research, biochemical enzyme assays and in vitro diagnostic analysis. 

Oligosaccharide mixture derived from the hydrolysis of tamarind xyloglucan with cellulase followed by β-galactosidase. A substrate for the assay of isoprimeverose releasing xyloglucan hydrolase.

Documents
Certificate of Analysis
Safety Data Sheet
Data Sheet
Publications
Megazyme publication

Versatile high resolution oligosaccharide microarrays for plant glycobiology and cell wall research.

Pedersen, H. L., Fangel, J. U., McCleary, B., Ruzanski, C., Rydahl, M. G., Ralet, M. C., Farkas, V., Von Schantz, L., Marcus, S. E., Andersen, M.C. F., Field, R., Ohlin, M., Knox, J. P., Clausen, M. H. & Willats, W. G. T. (2012). Journal of Biological Chemistry, 287(47), 39429-39438.

Microarrays are powerful tools for high throughput analysis, and hundreds or thousands of molecular interactions can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Nucleotide microarrays are well established in plant research, but carbohydrate microarrays are much less established, and one reason for this is a lack of suitable glycans with which to populate arrays. Polysaccharide microarrays are relatively easy to produce because of the ease of immobilizing large polymers noncovalently onto a variety of microarray surfaces, but they lack analytical resolution because polysaccharides often contain multiple distinct carbohydrate substructures. Microarrays of defined oligosaccharides potentially overcome this problem but are harder to produce because oligosaccharides usually require coupling prior to immobilization. We have assembled a library of well characterized plant oligosaccharides produced either by partial hydrolysis from polysaccharides or by de novo chemical synthesis. Once coupled to protein, these neoglycoconjugates are versatile reagents that can be printed as microarrays onto a variety of slide types and membranes. We show that these microarrays are suitable for the high throughput characterization of the recognition capabilities of monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and other oligosaccharide-binding proteins of biological significance and also that they have potential for the characterization of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

Hide Abstract
Publication

Structural and functional analysis of a multimodular hyperthermostable xylanase-glucuronoyl esterase from Caldicellulosiruptor kristjansonii.

Krska, D., Mazurkewich, S., Brown, H. A., Theibich, Y., Poulsen, J. C. N., Morris, A. L., Koropatkin, N. M., Leggio, L. L. & Larsbrink, J. (2021). Biochemistry, 60(27), 2206-2220.

The hyperthermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor kristjansonii encodes an unusual enzyme, CkXyn10C-GE15A, which incorporates two catalytic domains, a xylanase and a glucuronoyl esterase, and five carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from families 9 and 22. The xylanase and glucuronoyl esterase catalytic domains were recently biochemically characterized, as was the ability of the individual CBMs to bind insoluble polysaccharides. Here, we further probed the abilities of the different CBMs from CkXyn10C-GE15A to bind to soluble poly- and oligosaccharides using affinity gel electrophoresis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and differential scanning fluorimetry. The results revealed additional binding properties of the proteins compared to the former studies on insoluble polysaccharides. Collectively, the results show that all five CBMs have their own distinct binding preferences and appear to complement each other and the catalytic domains in targeting complex cell wall polysaccharides. Additionally, through renewed efforts, we have achieved partial structural characterization of this complex multidomain protein. We have determined the structures of the third CBM9 domain (CBM9.3) and the glucuronoyl esterase (GE15A) by X-ray crystallography. CBM9.3 is the second CBM9 structure determined to date and was shown to bind oligosaccharide ligands at the same site but in a different binding mode compared to that of the previously determined CBM9 structure from Thermotoga maritima. GE15A represents a unique intermediate between reported fungal and bacterial glucuronoyl esterase structures as it lacks two inserted loop regions typical of bacterial enzymes and a third loop has an atypical structure. We also report small-angle X-ray scattering measurements of the N-terminal CBM22.1–CBM22.2–Xyn10C construct, indicating a compact arrangement at room temperature.

Hide Abstract
Safety Information
Symbol : Not Applicable
Signal Word : Not Applicable
Hazard Statements : Not Applicable
Precautionary Statements : Not Applicable
Safety Data Sheet
Customers also viewed
Xyloglucan Tamarind P-XYGLN
Xyloglucan (Tamarind)
€137.00
Xyloglucan hepta octa nona saccharides O-XGHON
Xyloglucan (hepta+octa+nona saccharides)
€178.00