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Cellulase (endo-1,4-β-D-glucanase)
(Bacillus amyloliquefaciens)

Cellulase endo-1-4-beta-D-glucanase Bacillus amyloliquefaciens E-CELBA
Product code: E-CELBA
€171.00

3,500 Units at 40oC; 7,100 Units at 60oC

Prices exclude VAT

Available for shipping

Content: 3,500 Units at 40oC; 
7,100 Units at 60oC
Shipping Temperature: Ambient
Storage Temperature: 2-8oC
Formulation: In 3.2 M ammonium sulphate
Physical Form: Suspension
Stability: Minimum 1 year at 4oC. Check vial for details.
Enzyme Activity: endo-Cellulase
EC Number: 3.2.1.4
CAZy Family: GH5
CAS Number: 9012-54-8
Synonyms: cellulase; 4-beta-D-glucan 4-glucanohydrolase
Source: Bacillus amyloliquefaciens
Molecular Weight: 34,300
Concentration: Supplied at ~ 1,400 U/mL
Expression: Recombinant from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens
Specificity: endo-hydrolysis of (1,4)-β-D-glucosidic linkages in cellulose.
Specific Activity: ~ 60 U/mg (40oC, pH 6.0 on CM-cellulose 4M)
Unit Definition: One Unit of cellulase activity is defined as the amount of enzyme required to release one µmole of glucose reducing-sugar equivalents per minute from CM-Cellulose 4M (10 mg/mL) in sodium phosphate buffer (100 mM), pH 6 at 40oC.
Temperature Optima: 60oC
pH Optima: 6
Application examples: Applications established in diagnostics and research within the textiles, food and feed, carbohydrate and biofuels industries.

High purity recombinant Cellulase (endo-1,4-β-D-glucanase) (Bacillus amyloliquefaciens) for use in research, biochemical enzyme assays and in vitro diagnostic analysis.

Documents
Certificate of Analysis
Safety Data Sheet
Booklet
Publications
Megazyme publication
Measurement of endo-1,4-β-glucanase.

McCleary, B. V., McKie, V. & Draga, A. (2012). “Methods in Enzymology”, Volume 510, (H. Gilbert, Ed.), Elsevier Inc., pp. 1-17.

Several procedures are available for the measurement of endo-1,4-β-glucanase (EG). Primary methods employ defined oligosaccharides or highly purified polysaccharides and measure the rate of hydrolysis of glycosidic bonds using a reducing-sugar method. However, these primary methods are not suitable for the measurement of EG in crude fermentation broths due to the presence of reducing sugars and other enzymes active on these substrates. In such cases, dyed soluble or insoluble substrates are preferred as they are specific, sensitive, easy to use, and are not affected by other components, such as reducing sugars, in the enzyme preparation.

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Megazyme publication
New developments in the measurement of α-amylase, endo-protease, β-glucanase and β-xylanase.

McCleary, B. V. & Monaghan, D. (2000). “Proceedings of the Second European Symposium on Enzymes in Grain Processing”, (M. Tenkanen, Ed.), VTT Information Service, pp. 31-38.

Over the past 8 years, we have been actively involved in the development of simple and reliable assay procedures, for the measurement of enzymes of interest to the cereals and related industries. In some instances, different procedures have been developed for the measurement of the same enzyme activity (e.g. α-amylase) in a range of different materials (e.g. malt, cereal grains and fungal preparations). The reasons for different procedures may depend on several factors, such as the need for sensitivity, ease of use, robustness of the substrate mixture, or the possibility for automation. In this presentation, we will present information on our most up-to-date procedures for the measurement of α-amylase, endo-protease, β-glucanase and β-xylanase, with special reference to the use of particular assay formats in particular applications.

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Megazyme publication

Measurement of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in plants using chromogenic and colorimetric substrates.

McCleary, B. V. (1995). “New Diagnostics in Crop Sciences”, (J. R. Skerritt and R. Appels, Eds.), CAB International, pp. 277-301.

Enzymatic degradation of carbohydrates is of major significance in the industrial processing of cereals and fruits. In the production of beer, barley is germinated under well-defined conditions (malting) to induce maximum enzyme synthesis with minimum respiration of reserve carbohydrates. The grains are dried and then extracted with water under controlled conditions. The amylolytic enzymes synthesized during malting, as well as those present in the original barley, convert the starch reserves to fermentable sugars. Other enzymes act on the cell wall polysaccharides, mixed-linkage β-glucan and arabinoxylan, reducing the viscosity and thus aiding filtration, and reducing the possibility of subsequent precipitation of polymeric material (Bamforth, 1982). In baking, β-amylase and α-amylase give controlled degradation of starch to fermentable sugars so as to sustain yeast growth and gas production. Excess quantities of α-amylase in the flour result in excessive degradation of starch during baking which in turn gives a sticky crumb texture and subsequent problems with bread slicing. Juice yield from fruit pulp is significantly improved if cell-wall-degrading enzymes are used to destroy the three-dimensional structure and water-binding capacity of the pectic polysaccharide components of the cell walls. Problems of routine and reliable assay of carbohydrate-degrading enzymes in the presence of high levels of sugar compounds are experienced with such industrial processes.

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Megazyme publication

Measurement of polysaccharide degrading enzymes using chromogenic and colorimetric substrates.

McCleary, B. V. (1991). Chemistry in Australia, September, 398-401.

Enzymic degradation of carbohydrates is of major significance in the industrial processing of cereals and fruits. In the production of beer, barley is germinated under well defined conditions (malting) to induce maximum enzyme synthesis with minimum respiration of reserve carbohydrates. The grains are dried and then extracted with water under controlled conditions. The amylolytic enzymes synthesized during malting, as well as those present in the original barley, convert the starch reserves to fermentable sugars. Other enzymes act on the cell wall polysaccharides, mixed-linkage β-glucan and arabinoxylan, reducing the viscosity and thus aiding filtration, and reducing the possibility of subsequent precipitation of polymeric material. In baking, β-amylase and α-amylase give controlled degradation of starch to fermentable sugars so as to sustain yeast growth and gas production. Excess quantities of α-amylase in the flour result in excessive degradation of starch during baking which in turn gives a sticky crumb texture and subsequent problems with bread slicing. Juice yield from fruit pulp is significantly improved if cell-wall degrading enzymes are used to destroy the three-dimensional structure and water binding capacity of the pectic polysaccharide components of the cell walls. Problems of routine and reliable assay of carbohydrate degrading enzymes in the presence of high levels of sugar compounds are experienced with such industrial process.

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Publication
A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes.

Pierce, B. C., Agger, J. W., Zhang, Z., Wichmann, J. & Meyer, A. S. (2017). Carbohydrate Research, 449, 85-94.

Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes was evaluated in combination with endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase. Two enzymes (TrCel61A and Aspte6) showed the ability to release more than 36% of the pretreated soy spent flake glucose – a greater than 75% increase over the same treatment without LPMO addition.

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Publication
New glycosidase substrates for droplet-based microfluidic screening.

Najah, M., Mayot, E., Mahendra-Wijaya, I. P., Griffiths, A. D., Ladame, S. & Drevelle, A. (2013). Analytical Chemistry, 85(20), 9807-9814.

Droplet-based microfluidics is a powerful technique allowing ultra-high-throughput screening of large libraries of enzymes or microorganisms for the selection of the most efficient variants. Most applications in droplet microfluidic screening systems use fluorogenic substrates to measure enzymatic activities with fluorescence readout. It is important, however, that there is little or no fluorophore exchange between droplets, a condition not met with most commonly employed substrates. Here we report the synthesis of fluorogenic substrates for glycosidases based on a sulfonated 7-hydroxycoumarin scaffold. We found that the presence of the sulfonate group effectively prevents leakage of the coumarin from droplets, no exchange of the sulfonated coumarins being detected over 24 h at 30°C. The fluorescence properties of these substrates were characterized over a wide pH range, and their specificity was studied on a panel of relevant glycosidases (cellulases and xylanases) in microtiter plates. Finally, the β-D-cellobioside-6,8-difluoro-7-hydroxycoumarin-4-methanesulfonate substrate was used to assay cellobiohydrolase activity on model bacterial strains (Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis) in a droplet-based microfluidic format. These new substrates can be used to assay glycosidase activities in a wide pH range (4–11) and with incubation times of up to 24 h in droplet-based microfluidic systems.

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Publication
A role for CSLD3 during cell-wall synthesis in apical plasma membranes of tip-growing root-hair cells.

Park, S., Szumlanski, A. L., Gu, F., Guo, F. & Nielsen, E. (2011). Nature Cell Biology, 13(8), 973-980.

In plants, cell shape is defined by the cell wall, and changes in cell shape and size are dictated by modification of existing cell walls and deposition of newly synthesized cell-wall material. In root hairs, expansion occurs by a process called tip growth, which is shared by root hairs, pollen tubes and fungal hyphae. We show that cellulose-like polysaccharides are present in root-hair tips, and de novo synthesis of these polysaccharides is required for tip growth. We also find that eYFP–CSLD3 proteins, but not CESA cellulose synthases, localize to a polarized plasma-membrane domain in root hairs. Using biochemical methods and genetic complementation of a csld3 mutant with a chimaeric CSLD3 protein containing a CESA6 catalytic domain, we provide evidence that CSLD3 represents a distinct (1→4)-β-glucan synthase activity in apical plasma membranes during tip growth in root-hair cells.

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Safety Information
Symbol : GHS08
Signal Word : Danger
Hazard Statements : H334
Precautionary Statements : P261, P284, P304+P340, P342+P311, P501
Safety Data Sheet
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